Category: Health

Health – Abbottabad

The health facilities in Abbotabad include:

  • ALTAF HOSPITAL
  • RUQIA MATERNATY HOME
  • PERFECT DIAGNOSTIC CENTRE
  • AL SYED HOSPITAL
  • EHSAN GENERAL HOSPITAL
  • SHAHINA JAMIL HOSPITAL
  • ROOHI HOSPITAL
  • Ayub Teaching Hospital
  • District Head Quarter Hospital

It has been reported that refugees often have difficulties accessing public hospitals. When they are admitted, the quality of service that they receive is also reported to be lower than that received by the host community.

Health – Charsadda

Public health facilities in Charsadda include:

  • 1 District Head Quarter Hospital,
  • 1 Tehsil Head Quater Hospital,
  • 3 Rural Health Centres,
  • 10 Dispensaries,
  • 43 Basic Health Units (BHU),
  • 2 Mother and Child Health Care

Private health facilities include:

  • ZAM ZAM DIAGNOSTIC CENTRE (TANGI ROAD CHARSADA),
  • HI TECH DIAGNOSTIC CENTRE (OPP GRID STATION HOSPITAL ROAD TANGI DISTRICT CHARSADDA),
  • ABASIN HOSPITAL (ABASIN HOSPITAL MICHINI ROAD SHABQADAR DISTRICT CHARSADDA),
  • AL KHAIR HOSPITAL (OPP MICHANI ROAD),
  • SHABQADAR BAZAR CHARSADDA (SHABQADAR BAZAR GONDA KATOZAI ROAD CHARSADDA),
  • Islamia Clinic (VILLAGE & P/O UMERZAI DISTRICT CHARSADDA),
  • Durrani Welfare Clinic (NISATA ADDA NOWSHERA ROAD CHARSADDA),
  • NAGUMAN WELFARE CLINIC (NAGUMAN CHOWK SHABQADAR ROAD CHARSADDA)

The BHUs are located within refugee villages outside of Charsadda and are available also to urban refugees. Unregistered Afghan migrants do not access basic health facilities for fear of being deported under section 14 of the foreigners act.

Health – Haripur

The follow health facilities are available in Haripur:

  • DHQ, Meelam Health Care Center,
  • YAHYA WELFARE COMPLEX HOSPITAL,
  • Shah Faisal Hospital,
  • Rasheed Hospital,
  • Mothercare hospital,
  • Rehman Memoral Complex Hospital,
  • AL GHAZI SURGICAL & GENERAL HOSPITAL,
  • ABDULAH HOSPITAL,
  • SHER KHAN HOSPITAL

The quality of health services available in Haripur is thought to be lower than that available in neighbouring districts.

It has also been reported that refugees often have difficulties accessing public hospitals. When they are admitted, the quality of service that they receive is also reported to be lower than that received by the host community.

Health – Islamabad

In Islamabad, the following public health facilities are available:

  • Post graduate institute of medical sciences(PIMS),
  • Poly clinic hospital,
  • Capital development hospital

And these private sector facilities are available:

  • Ali medical hospital,
  • Maroof Hospital,
  • Islamabad private hospital,
  • CDA Hospital
  • Shifa International Hospital.

Health – Islamabad and Rawalpindi

Refugees can access public or private hospitals directly without prejudice. However, some refugees with protection issues or a fear of being identified by their enemies avoid going to hospitals, even if they require treatment.

It has also been reported that some hospital staff in public hospitals discriminate against refugees by offering delayed or sub-standard service as these hospitals are normally extremely busy. In addition, those refugees living in slum areas often have greater difficulty accessing basic services as these areas are not recognised by the municipal authorities.

The refugee community would benefit from greater awareness of common health problems and how they can be mitigated.

Health – Karachi

Public health facilities in Karachi include:

  • Civil Hospital,
  • Jinnah Hospital,
  • Dow Medical Hospital,
  • Sindh Hospital Korangi/Landi,
  • KPT Hospital Kemari,
  • BHU Tarogoth

Private health facilities include:

  • Zia Uddin Hospital Nazimabad,
  • Liaqat National Hospital,
  • Kiran Hopital Gulshan,
  • Patel Hospital Gulshan,
  • Memo Hospital Gulshan,
  • Sultan Hospital Korangi,
  • Indus Hospital Korangi,
  • Al-Mustafa Hospital Gulshan,
  • Asadullah Medical Centre,
  • Madina General Hospital Gulshan Ghazi,
  • Faiz-u-Rehan General Hospital Metrovil Site,
  • Ali Children General Hospital Ittihad Town,
  • Agha Medical Centre Gadap town

Refugees and unregistered Afghan migrants generally cannot access public hospitals in Karachi. Those Afghans that are admitted receive a sub-standard quality of service.

However, SHARP does refer Afghan refugees and asylum seekers for primary health services.

The Afghan community has recommended that health services should be more accessible in Karachi, possibly through outreach visits to scattered communities.

The refugee community would benefit from greater awareness of the available health services and how to access these services as well as common health problems and how they can be mitigated. Establishing community level health committees would help these communities develop stronger linkages with the government health authorities.

Health – Kohat

Kohat has the following health facilities:

  • 21 Government basic health units (BHUs),
  • 4 Regional Health Clinics (RHCs),
  • 9 Dispensaries,
  • 4 Hospitals,
  • 2 MCH Centres

A recent project within the RAHA programme helped improve the facilities available at KDA Hospital.

It has also been reported that refugees often have difficulties accessing public hospitals.

Unregistered Afghan migrants do not access basic health facilities for fear of being deported under section 14 of the foreigners act.

All of the government health facilities need modernisation, staff require capacity building and there is a requirement for more medicine and equipment.

Health – Lahore

The following health facilities are available in Lahore:

  • Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, 17-Queen’s Road,
  • Mayo Hospital,
  • Lady Willington Hospital,
  • Lady Aitcheson Hospital,
  • District head quarter hospital,
  • Fountain mental health hospital,
  • Railway hospital,
  • Fatima Memorial Hospital,
  • Shadman,
  • Khair-un-Nisa Hospital, Civic Centre, Faisal Town

Several health related projects have been completed within the RAHA programme:

  • Renovation of BHU duildings,
  • Provision of equipment and furniture in Mayo hospital,
  • Provision of equipment and Furniture in Mian Munshi (DHQ Lahore)

Private hospitals are expensive for refugees and therefore rarely utilised.

Refugees and unregistered Afghan migrants generally can access public hospitals in Lahore. Those Afghans that are admitted normally have to pay for the same services (called Bait-ul-Mas) that are free for the host community (e.g. Hepatitis and Thalassemia).

The Afghan community in Lahore has requested greater advocacy by UNHCR with the provincial government (specifically the Ministry of Social Welfare) so that Bait-ul-mas could be extended to include Afghan refugees.

The refugee community would benefit from greater awareness of common health problems and how they can be mitigated.

Health – Mansehra

A national expanded program of immunisation (EPI) started in 1994 there are 880 lady health workers (LHW) working throughout Mansehra.

The following public health activities are active in Mansehra:

  • TB Control,
  • Leprosy Control,
  • Malaria Control,
  • Nutrition & Health Education,
  • Preventive Dental Care

Mansehra hosts the following public health facilities:

  • 1 DHQ Hospital,
  • 1 Leprosy Hospital Mansehra,
  • 1 DHQ Hospitals,
  • 9 Civil Hospitals,
  • 8 Rural Health Centres,
  • 58 Basic Health units,
  • 18 Civil Dispensaries,
  • 3 MCH centres,
  • 1 TB centre,
  • 4 Leprosy Clinics (within FLCFs)

It has been reported that refugees often have difficulties accessing public hospitals. They often have to wait for longer than patients from the host community and are not given free medicine from the available stock.

All of the government health facilities need modernisation.

Health – Mardan

Mardan hosts the following public health facilities:

  • 1 Teaching Hospital,
  • 1 District hospital,
  • 1 Tertiary hospital,
  • 6 Regional Health Clinics,
  • 49 BHUs,
  • 14 Dispensaries,
  • 2 Mother and Child Health Centres,
  • 2 other health facilities

Private health facilities include 4 medical centres and 6 hospitals. In addition, a number of private clinics are also available.

Refugees and unregistered Afghan migrants generally cannot access public hospitals. Those refugees that are admitted normally have to pay for the same services that are free for the host community (e.g. Hepatitis and Thalassemia). Health officials at these centres instead refer Afghans to one of the BHUs or health facilities in the refugee villages.

The executive district office (Health) has requested support from international partners to provide support to the health sector in particular.

Health – Mirpur

Mirpur has a public health centre and Afghans generally go to the DHQ hospital if they require treatment. Some Afghans are admitted to private hospitals but these tend to be too expensive for the majority of Afghans.

Those Afghans that are admitted to public hospitals normally have to pay for the same services (called Bait-ul-Mas) that are free for the host community (e.g. Hepatitis and Thalassemia).

Health – Nowshera

Public health facilities in Nowshera include:

  • 1 District hospital,
  • 1 Tertiary hospital (MRHSM in PABBI),
  • 2 Civil Hospitals (Category D – AKORA KHATAK & ZIYARAT KAKA SAHIB),
  • 6 Rural Health Centres (RHC),
  • 16 Civil dispensaries,
  • 3 Mother and Child health centres,
  • 1 Sub health Centres,
  • 30 Basic Health Units (BHU),
  • 1 TB Clinic,
  • At least 150 Private Hospitals and Clinics (EDO estimate)

There are many organisation supporting the government in the health sector in Nowshera, including: CHIP, Merlin, IRC, Johanniter, Flower, Youth Catalyst Pakistan, URDO, CAMP and BDN.

There have been a number of projects within the RAHA programme in the health sector ranging from the provision of equipment, sterilized tools, furniture and refrigerators to the construction of labour rooms and maternity centres.

Afghan refugees are admitted to government health facilities without prejudice, though unregistered Afghan migrants generally cannot access public hospitals.

The refugee community would benefit from greater awareness of common health problems and how they can be mitigated.

Health – Peshawar

Public health facilities in Peshawar include:

  • Khyber Teaching Hospital (KTH),
  • Lady Reading Hospital (LRH),
  • Hayatabad Medical Complex,
  • Kidney Centre,
  • One police and one Combined military hospitals,
  • 16 BHUs,
  • 9 Mother and Child Health centres,
  • 1 District Headquarter Hospital (DHQH) and
  • 1 Tehsil Headquarter Hospital

Private hospitals include:

  • Northwest,
  • Rehman Medical Institute,
  • Kuwait Teaching Hospital,
  • Naseer Teaching hospital,
  • Johar Khatoon,
  • City Hospital.

Others notable health centres are: Paraplegic, PIPOS, Fauji Foundation, Al-khidmat Foundation, Frontier Foundation, Molvi Jee Hospital, Marcy Hospital and many private medical complexes and hospitals including Khyber medical complex and various other childrens hospitals. A branch of Shaukat Khanum memorial is also under construction.

A District Health Profile was conducted by PAIMAN in 2009. Since then, the following projects have been conducted within the RAHA programme:

  • Rehabilitation works in the gynaecological ward and installation of an incinerator at Khyber Teaching Hospital, in 2013.
  • Construction of GAIT analysis lab at PIPOS for artificial limbs.
  • Construction of a gynaecological ward in the Hayatabad Medical Complex.
  • Constructed/Rehabilitated 13 labour rooms at Basic Health Units.

Refugees and unregistered Afghan migrants generally can access public hospitals without prejudice. However, those Afghans that are admitted normally have to pay for the same services that are free for the host community (e.g. Hepatitis and Thalassemia).

Health – Quetta

Unlike refugee villages (former camps), there are no separate UNHCR supported health facilities for refugees in urban areas of Quetta. The only exception is an HIV prevention and support unit for refugee drug users.

Refugees can avail the services at all public sector health facilities and pay the standard fees for these services.

Interestingly, according to the data provided by the Department of Health, Afghans constitute 50% of the total case load in all hospitals in Quetta. It is thought that many Afghans living in Afghanistan visit Quetta for health treatments as the quality of the hospitals in Quetta are significantly better than hospitals in neighbouring regions of Afghanistan.

The following health facilities in Quetta provide health services to both host and refugee communities:

  • Bolan Medical Complex Hospital,
  • Sandeman Provincial Hospital,
  • Fatima Jinnah General & Chest Hospital,
  • Helpers Eye Hospital,
  • Layton Rahmatullah Benevolent Trust (LRBT) Eye Hospital,
  • CENAR cancer Hospital,
  • Mission Hospital Quetta,
  • Lady Dufferin Hospital

In addition to these hospitals, there are 8 basic health units (BHUs) on the outskirts of Quetta to which refugees also have equal access.

The social welfare department provides services for the rehabilitation of disabled people through artificial prosthetic limbs and care of children with special needs. Refugees can also avail these services without any discrimination.

In the private sector, the following hospitals are in Quetta:

  • Alkhidmat Hospital,
  • SAIBAN Family hospital,
  • Jam-e-Shafa Hospitals are charity hospitals which provide treatment either free or on payment of very minimal user charges.

In total there are more than 10 big private hospital which provide all services under one roof but refugees have to pay accordingly. UNHCR does support medical assistance in these hospitals for a few extremely vulnerable individuals identified within the refugee community.

UNHCR conducts a number of health projects in Quetta, including:

  1. Since 2009, the prevention of HIV among drug users in Quetta,
  2. Establishment of 40 bed intensive care unit in Fatima Jinnah General & Chest Hospital,
  3. Construction of a fully equipped labour room in BHU Pashtoon Bagh,
  4. Construction of a fully equipped labour room in BHU Killi Kechi Baig,
  5. Construction of a fully equipped labour room in BHU Killi Samungli,

Regarding health services, generally Afghans (refugees and unregistered migrants alike) have no issue in accessing any public or private sector health facility in Quetta. However, they have to pay the standard fees for all services, which are set centrally by the department of health. The Social Welfare Department do support poor and needy Pakistani patients using Zakat funds (a religious tax in Pakistan), for which refugees are not eligible.

Health facilities are available in almost all localities and are accessible by public transport which is utilised equally by the host and refugee communities.

Not all hospital provide the same quality of services and there are thematic gaps in the service provision of certain hospitals. A number of health projects have been completed within the RAHA programme. The following list of projects has been highlighted by the local community and provincial administration as important, but funding for the projects has not yet been confirmed:

  1. Strengthening of nephrology (kidney) centre in all tertiary hospitals,
  2. Strengthening of cold storage chain at provincial EPI warehouse,
  3. Renovation and rehabilitation of 3 BHUs on the outskirts of Quetta,
  4. Strengthening of gynaecological and observation unit in all tertiary hospitals,
  5. Provision of equipment to CENAR Cancer hospital,
  6. Strengthening of paediatric unit in all tertiary hospitals,
  7. Awareness of general public regarding utilisation of existing health services.

Health – Rawalpindi

In Rawalpindi, the following public health facilities are available:

  • Holy Family Hospital,
  • District Headquarters Hospital,
  • IIMC-T Railway Hospital

And these private sector facilities are available:

  • Hanif Hospital,
  • Centre Hospital,
  • Ahmad Hospital,
  • Al Ehsan Hospital,
  • Amanat Eye Hospital,
  • Saleem Akhtar Memorial Welfare Hospital,
  • Bilal Hospital,
  • Cantonment Hospital,
  • Combined Military Hospital (CMH),
  • Hayat Wali Medical Centre,
  • Hearts International,
  • Hope Medical Dental & Diagnostics,
  • Jinnah Memorial Hospital,
  • Maryam Memorial Hospital,
  • Military Hospital (MH),
  • Raazi Hospital,
  • Rawalpindi General Hospital

Health – Swabi

Public health facilities include:

  • 1 DHQ Hospital,
  • 2 THQ Hospitals,
  • 38 BHUs run by SRSP,
  • 4 RHCs,
  • 3 MCHC,
  • 10 Private Health Centres

RAHA projects in Swabi include a 2013 solid waste management project in which the town management authority was provided with bins to better manage solid waste.

Refugees and unregistered Afghan migrants generally cannot access public hospitals in Swabi. Those Afghans that are admitted normally have to pay for the same services that are free for the host community (e.g. Hepatitis and Thalassemia).

Health facilities in Swabi, particularly the private facilities, are reported to lack adequate medical equipment and qualified staff.